Cholesterol food facts

Milk:

Many of us have already made the switch from whole milk to some kind of lower-fat milk. But truthfully, drinking 2% milk isn’t that much better for us. It still contains 5g of total fat and 3g of saturated fat per one-cup serving. We should really aim for nonfat milk at best, and 1% milk at least. But it doesn’t end there. Choose low-fat or nonfat ice creams or yogurts over full fat versions, and do the same for sour cream.

Cheese:

Choose low-fat or fat-free cottage cheese, cream cheese and

hard cheeses. True, some hard cheeses don’t melt as well in cooking. Part-skim
ricotta cheese or mozzarella are good lower-fat substitutes, though there are
also fat-free versions. Try stronger cheeses such as Gruyere, Gorgonzola or
Parmesan to add maximum flavor per ounce.

Butter and Margarine:

The problem with butter is its high levels of saturated fat

and cholesterol; the trouble with margarine (especially stick margarine) is its
high levels of trans fats, which arise from the hydrogenation process that
converts liquid vegetable oils into solid fat. Tub margarine and liquid spread
contain fewer or no trans fats, and some spreads contain special ingredients
that actively lower bad cholesterol. These would be better choices.

Eggs:

The problem with butter is its high levels of saturated fat

and cholesterol; the trouble with margarine (especially stick margarine) is its
high levels of trans fats, which arise from the hydrogenation process that
converts liquid vegetable oils into solid fat. Tub margarine and liquid spread
contain fewer or no trans fats, and some spreads contain special ingredients
that actively lower bad cholesterol. These would be better choices.

Eggs:

Yes, they do contain high levels of dietary cholesterol, yet

in other ways they pack a heavy nutritional punch, as a great source of
vitamins and minerals. But you can always use egg whites or egg substitutes
instead, especially if you have to watch your cholesterol. And even if you
don’t, use whole eggs sparingly.

Meat:

Fish—preferably fresh fish rather than high-fat fish

sticks—should be consumed at least twice a week. Be sure to include even the
fattier variety such as salmon, since they contain high levels of heart-healthy
omega-3 fatty acids.

02 September 2020

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